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Self-direction online through structured task activity: Is online moderation always needed?
PROCEEDINGS

, Australian Catholic University, Australia ; , University of New England, Australia

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Denver, Colorado, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-45-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

A great deal of research has been conducted on the roles of online moderators and on support structures needed for successful online collaboration and productive learning. While some research indicates the need for highly structured environments with facilitation and tutor support, this case study suggests that by utilising well designed inquiry oriented tasks, students learn to self-direct their own activities. In the study presented here, the assessment of the task increased student motivation and task based interactions indicated that supportive feedback and social exchange was a characteristic feature of successful task engagement.

Citation

McLoughlin, C. & Parkes, M. (2002). Self-direction online through structured task activity: Is online moderation always needed?. In P. Barker & S. Rebelsky (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2002--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1293-1298). Denver, Colorado, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 23, 2019 from .

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