You are here:

Measuring the Learning Cost of Presentation Interference
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of presentation interference on students' ability to learn from, and their beliefs regarding, computer-generated presentations. Informed by single-element screen design studies and professional practice, this combined-element study compared a contextually based, intentionally interference free presentation against two presentations containing multiple, typical design flaws. Undergraduate students (n=118) were randomly assigned to three groups, and subjects individually viewed one of the three treatments. Following the presentation, subjects completed a post test and a belief questionnaire. Three hypotheses were tested: (1) subjects receiving presentations with no intentional presentation interference would perform better on the post test; (2) subjects receiving presentations with less interference would perform better than those receiving presentations with more interference; and (3) subjects in the interference-free presentation group would report more positive beliefs regarding computer generated presentations than would subjects receiving presentations with interference. Results indicated significantly higher posttest scores for the interference free presentation group. It was concluded that, although the well designed presentation and a presentation containing intentional interference both resulted in strong beliefs regarding the beneficial nature of computer generated presentations, treatments containing presentation interference significantly reduced learning. (Contains 65 references.) (Author/DLS)

Citation

Bradshaw, A.C. (1998). Measuring the Learning Cost of Presentation Interference. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved July 4, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords