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Interaction and Collaboration via Computer Conferencing
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study examined interaction and communication patterns among students (n=9) and with the instructor in a graduate course offered at a distance using the FirstClass computer conferencing (CC) software. Specifically, the following questions were addressed: (1) What are similarities and differences in interaction and collaboration between CC and face-to-face learning environments? (2) How does the medium of exchange in CC encourage or discourage online discussion? (3) What collaborative learning strategies are used in CC? and (4) What is the instructor's role in the CC environment? Data sources consisted of transcripts of all computer conferences, real-time (synchronous) chats, and students' electronic journals about CC; results of pre- and post-course CC attitude surveys; and notes from semi-structured interviews with participants. Data analysis was done using the constant comparative method. Figures include: the FirstClass desktop; the code words found in each type of conference; a flow chart of the types of asynchronous conferences; and summaries of the types of messages in student-moderated, instructional, auxiliary, and metacognitive conferences. Qualitative results are discussed related to each of the four research questions. The instructor's role in computer conferencing is analyzed. (Contains 26 references.) (DLS)

Citation

Murphy, K.L., Drabier, R. & Epps, M.L. (1998). Interaction and Collaboration via Computer Conferencing. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved December 12, 2019 from .

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