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Distance Education: Analysis of Far- and Near-Site Interaction Patterns
PROCEEDINGS

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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This paper reports on a study that explored the possibility of measuring distance education classes using the Media Sensor, a device designed to sample and record various electronic impulses generated during a distance education session. Research questions explored: (1) the ability of the Media Sensor to identify patterns in the audio and video data; (2) identification of specific types of patterns; (3) the correlation between the pattern and the actual instructional situation; and (4) prediction of instructional events by identifying specific patterns from Media Sensor data. The research team defined the following categories of classroom events by analyzing videotapes of several distance education sessions: far-end interaction, i.e., dialogs between far- and near-end people; near-end interaction, i.e., dialogs between people at the near end; teacher talking/lecturing; and unknown/other. Furthermore, the team identified patterns by comparing the categories and the raw data recorded by the Media Sensor, testing the validity and reliability of the patterns, and applying them to construct the context within distance education. Findings indicated a high correlation between the Media Sensor data and the instructional situation. Figures illustrate the location of the Media Sensor on the television screen; sample data sheets; Decision Making Trees; video observation data; and coding/decoding stages. (DLS)

Citation

Shih, P.H.C., Hara, N., Li, S. & Yi, Q. (1998). Distance Education: Analysis of Far- and Near-Site Interaction Patterns. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved April 9, 2020 from .

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