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A Paradigm for Enhancing Course Offerings Using CD-ROM, Interactive Video and E-mail
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study explored asynchronous delivery modalities in a distance education program and investigated a paradigm for enhancing interactivity in distance education using CD-ROM, interactive video, and e-mail. The purposes of the investigation were to: (1) create an asynchronous distance learning environment based in these technologies; (2) build into the program multiple interactive prompts (readiness, conditional, non-linear branching, consequential, and reflective) and delivery techniques (interactive video, textual, and graphic); and (3) evaluate both accessibility and program impact upon student learning and attitudes. A combination of computer programs, CD-ROM, videotapes, and e-mail served as the delivery mechanism for a graduate level course on secondary school curriculum. Due to various computer problems, not all students were online at the beginning of the course. Although they could use the post office to mail their projects to the instructor until they obtained the necessary hardware, some did not take the initiative to do that. Hence, a major problem of this type of distribution mechanism is evident in that it requires personal motivation to complete the course. Most of the students found the course to be successful. (AEF)

Citation

Summers, J. & Reck, L. (1998). A Paradigm for Enhancing Course Offerings Using CD-ROM, Interactive Video and E-mail. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved March 30, 2020 from .

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