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The Use of Embedded Scaffolds with Hypermedia-Supported Student-Centered Learning Article

, Auburn University, United States ; , Arizona State University, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 10, Number 4, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

There is growing evidence that student-centered learning activities promote the development of higher-order skills such as critical thinking and problem solving. However, there are difficulties associated with supporting student-centered learning. These problems have led to the proposal that additional aids, or scaffolds, are needed to assist students engaged in this type of learning. Scaffolds are tools, strategies, and guides, which support students in attaining a higher level of understanding; one that would be impossible if students worked on their own.

Although there are many descriptive discussions and reports outlining how scaffolds have been used, there is little empirical research dealing with the types of scaffolds needed for student-centered learning activities or how students use scaffolds to support the tasks they need to accomplish. The purpose of this article is twofold. First, the types of scaffolds embedded into Decision Point!, a hypermedia database dealing with the African-American civil rights movement is described. These scaffolds were designed to support students in a research activity using the database as a resource. Second, how the scaffolds were used to complete the activity are discussed, and the types of scaffolds that were most successful at assisting students with gathering and synthesizing information available in the database, and with assisting with group self-regulation are explored.

Citation

Saye, J. & Brush, T. (2001). The Use of Embedded Scaffolds with Hypermedia-Supported Student-Centered Learning. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 10(4), 333-356. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 15, 2017 from .

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