Login or register for free to remove ads.
You are here:

The Effects of Synchronous and Asynchronous Distance Education: A Meta-Analytical Assessment of Simonson's "Equivalency Theory" PROCEEDINGS

, , , ,

Association for Educational Communications and Technology Annual Meeting,

Abstract

Simonson, Schlosser and Hanson (1999) argue that a new theory called “equivalency theory” is needed to account for the unique features of the “teleconferencing” (synchronous) model of DE that is prevalent in many North American universities. Based on a comprehensive meta-analysis of the comparative literature of DE (Bernard, Abrami, Lou, Wozney, Borokhovski, Wallet, Wade, Fiset, & Huang, in press), we are able to assess empirically whether equivalency has been achieved in prior comparative DE research. This paper includes a brief summary of the results of the split between synchronous and asynchronous patterns of DE, and addresses the implications these data have for developing separate theories of DE for synchronous (i.e., group-based) and asynchronous (i.e., individualized) applications. We examine data based on achievement, attitude and retention outcomes and coded study features (i.e., methodological, pedagogical and media) relating to them.

Citation

Bernard, R.M., Abrami, P.C., Wade, A., Borokhovski, E. & Lou, Y. (2005). The Effects of Synchronous and Asynchronous Distance Education: A Meta-Analytical Assessment of Simonson's "Equivalency Theory". Presented at Association for Educational Communications and Technology Annual Meeting 2005. Retrieved October 19, 2017 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords