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Assessing Computer Use and Perceived Course Effectiveness in Post-Secondary Education in an American/Canadian Context ARTICLE

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Journal of Educational Computing Research Volume 39, Number 3, ISSN 0735-6331

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship between computer technology's role and students' perceptions about course effectiveness. Students from two universities (one Canadian, n = 1465; one American, n = 831) completed a 71-item questionnaire addressing different aspects of their learning experience in a given course. Factor analysis revealed a 3-factor solution: “course-structure,” “active-learning and time-on-task,” and “computer-use.” Regression analysis indicated that the 3 variables are predictive of perceived course effectiveness at both sites, with the presence of an interaction between location and “computer-use” and “course-structure” on students' perceptions about course effectiveness. Findings reveal that student perceptions directly reflect the 14 APA learner-centered principles on which the instrument was based. (Contains 5 tables.)

Citation

Tamim, R.M., Lowerison, G., Schmid, R.F., Bernard, R.M., Abrami, P.C. & Dehler, C. (2008). Assessing Computer Use and Perceived Course Effectiveness in Post-Secondary Education in an American/Canadian Context. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 39(3), 221-234. Retrieved October 16, 2018 from .

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