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Ethical judgments and behaviors: Applying a multidimensional ethics scale to measuring ICT ethics of college students
ARTICLE

Computers & Education Volume 53, Number 3, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Assuming that ICT ethics are influenced by both moral and circumstantial factors, the study investigates Japanese college students’ ethical judgments and behavioral intentions in three scenarios involving ICT-related ethical problems and explores why they make such decisions, relying on five moral philosophies: moral equity, relativism, contractualism, egoism, and utilitarianism. The findings reveal that except for egoism, four moral dimensions affect ethical decisions of Japanese college students, each having different effects according to the particular ethical situation presented. Overall, the concepts of justice, fairness and moral rightness were found to influence these students’ ethical judgments in all ICT-related ethical dilemmas; legal obligations and benefits to society were found to have a weaker impact. It was also found that the students may behave unethically in ICT-related matters if these behaviors are perceived as culturally or traditionally acceptable or not perceived to be morally wrong. In conclusion, further research is suggested to analyze various scenario effects on students’ ICT-related ethical decisions and to investigate how cultural, professional and other environmental factors affect ethical decision-making. The establishment of a coherent ICT ethics policy in colleges is also proposed.

Citation

Jung, I. (2009). Ethical judgments and behaviors: Applying a multidimensional ethics scale to measuring ICT ethics of college students. Computers & Education, 53(3), 940-949. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.05.011

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