Login or register for free to remove ads.
You are here:

Challenge Based Learning: The Report from the Implementation Project REPORT

, , New Media Consortium, United States

Abstract

We know we have work to do to address the problems that face American public education.
We’ve known this for nearly three decades, since the publication of A Nation at Risk in 1983,3 which powerfully documented that the United States had lost the advantage it briefly held in the world in science, commerce, technology, and industry; that as custodians of the education of the young, we were failing; that without immediate, conscious, and focused effort, that failure would only compound itself; and that in countries all around the globe, students were being better prepared to take part in a rapidly flattening marketplace than our own students were.
No such immediate, conscious, and focused effort has taken place. Until now.
After two major studies involving 24 schools in three countries and 15 states, over 1,500 students, and 90 teachers, it is clear that challenge based learning (CBL) is one of the freshest ideas that has emerged over that time, with replicable, scalable results for students at nearly every grade level. The approach is consistent with standards-based curricula, and does not require a massive reinvention of schools, nor the kind of top-to-bottom overhaul that some say is needed. It is based on a simple but powerful idea — make learning relevant.

Citation

Johnson, L. & Brown, S. (2011). Challenge Based Learning: The Report from the Implementation Project. Austin, TX, USA: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved September 23, 2017 from .

 Permission is granted under a Creative Commons Attribution License to replicate, copy, distribute, transmit, or adapt this report freely provided that attribution is provided as illustrated in the citation below.

To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Johnson, L. and Adams, S., (2011). Challenge Based Learning: The Report from the Implementation Project. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.