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Networked Schools in New Zealand: Examples from the Virtual Learning Network
PROCEEDINGS

, Wayne State University, Canada ; , University of Canterbury, New Zealand ; , CORE Education, New Zealand

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This proposal describes a study into the development of virtual learning in New Zealand, specifically to identify examples of networked schools. Using a variety of data collection methods, the researchers identified four examples where e-learning clusters acted as a change agent to reform classroom instruction and how schools were organised. These included where teaching online changed teachers’ classroom pedagogy, allowing flexibility within the school timetable so students could enroll in courses regardless of when the course was being “taught,” a transformation of the role of the school-based teacher from a subject matter specialist to generalist responsible for facilitating students’ learning, and re-considering the physical space to accommodate student learning in a twenty-first century networked school.

Citation

Barbour, M., Davis, N. & Wenmoth, D. (2013). Networked Schools in New Zealand: Examples from the Virtual Learning Network. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4102-4107). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 15, 2018 from .

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