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Navigating Access and Maintaining Established Practice: Social Studies Teachers’ Technology Integration at Three Florida Middle Schools
ARTICLE

, University of Louisville, United States

CITE Journal Volume 11, Number 3, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This mixed methods multiple case study explored middle school social studies teachers’ instructional use of digital technology at three suburban middle schools This mixed methods, multiple-case study explored middle school social studies teachers’ instructional use of digital technology at three suburban middle schools in a large Florida school district. Findings from this study indicate that the participant teachers viewed technology integration as being beneficial for their students’ future success; however, their practice did not reflect this professed importance. The participant teachers largely used available classroom technology for teacher-centered activities, including information gathering and presentation. Few teachers in this study utilized available technology for student-centered instructional pedagogy. Findings from this study suggest that a single-cause explanation for why teachers do or do not integrate technology into their teaching is insufficient. There appear to be multiple factors influencing the teachers’ practices, including access to and functionality of technology, teacher attitude toward and comfort with technology, and teaching philosophy and pedagogical practice.

Citation

Sheffield, C. (2011). Navigating Access and Maintaining Established Practice: Social Studies Teachers’ Technology Integration at Three Florida Middle Schools. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 11(3), 282-312. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Revisiting the "Sleeping Giant" Metaphor: Is It Still Sleeping in the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Is It Still Really a Giant?

    Hicks David, Virginia Tech, United States; Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 14, No. 2 (June 2014) pp. 141–157

  2. A Year of Reflection: The More Things Change

    Mark Pearcy, Rider University, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 13, No. 4 (December 2013) pp. 360–385

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.