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Improving Learning of Procedural Computer-based Tasks: A Preliminary Study
PROCEEDINGS

, Center of General Education, National Taichung University of Education, Taiwan ; , Graduate School of Strategic Management of Small & Medium Enterprise, TransWorld University, Taiwan

Global Learn, in Melbourne, Australia ISBN 978-1-880094-85-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

Animated demonstrations are often preferred by users as a means to learning procedural computer-based tasks, despite the discouraging results that this is an area where animations do not appear to be effective. This study thus aimed to investigate how to make animations become more beneficial to learning. In this study, the instructional efficiency of four different representation formats was investigated. The four different formats included (1) static condition, (2) demonstration-text condition, (3) demonstration-spoken condition, and (4) demonstration-spoken + key static pictures condition. To determine the instructional efficiency of the four conditions, relative efficiency scores were calculated as a joint function of mental load and performance measures, using Paas and van Merriënboer’s (1993) technique. The findings revealed that overall animations tended to be more effective than static pictures when utilized to facilitate students’ learning of procedural computer-based tasks.

Citation

Chen, C.Y. & Liao, R.Y. (2011). Improving Learning of Procedural Computer-based Tasks: A Preliminary Study. In S. Barton, J. Hedberg & K. Suzuki (Eds.), Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2011--Global Conference on Learning and Technology (pp. 1942-1947). Melbourne, Australia: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 14, 2019 from .

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