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Does perceived importance of reflection influences the extent of in-depth reflection?
PROCEEDINGS

, KULeuven & KATHO, Belgium ; , KULeuven, Belgium

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-76-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

In this contribution a study on the combined effects of two approaches to reflect and the perceived importance of reflection on in-depth reflection is reported. 37 pre-service teachers participated. Results show that students score higher on in-depth reflection when they use the ALACT model of Korthagen than when they reflect by writing a digital story. Results also reveal an effect of perceived importance of reflection; when students perceived reflection as important, they score higher on in-depth reflection then when they find reflection less important. We also establish an interaction between approach and the perceived importance of reflection on in-depth reflection. A profile plot shows that when students use digital storytelling to reflect, the interaction of perceived importance of reflection and approach on in-depth reflection is smaller than when they reflect with the ALACT model. This – so we assume - can be reduced to the fact that digital storytelling was a new approach for the students.

Citation

Callens, J.C. & Elen, J. (2009). Does perceived importance of reflection influences the extent of in-depth reflection?. In T. Bastiaens, J. Dron & C. Xin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2009--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1543-1548). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 23, 2019 from .

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