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Measuring the Impact of Robotics and Geospatial Technologies on Youth Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Attitudes PROCEEDINGS

, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families, and Schools, United States ; , University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States ; , University of Kentucky, United States ; , University of Nebraska-Omaha, United States ; , , University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The Nebraska 4-H organization has developed a robotics and geospatial technologies instructional program for middle school youth (ages 11 to 15 years). Research and evaluation results across the three years of the project have shown that the program has positively impacted student learning, but the impact on student attitudes has been difficult to document, largely because of the difficulty in measuring attitudes. This paper describes the three-year process to assess the attitudinal impact of the robotics/geospatial program and discusses the measurement challenges. There were problems in using existing, published attitudinal instruments and challenges in developing and validating scores from a new instrument. Results are reported from the use of this new instrument with 147 middle school youth attending six 4-H facilitated summer camps focused on robotics and geospatial technologies. The Likert-scaled instrument, showing items for the eight scales, is included with this paper.

Citation

Nugent, G., Barker, B., Toland, M., Grandgenett, N., Hampton, A. & Adamchuk, V. (2009). Measuring the Impact of Robotics and Geospatial Technologies on Youth Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Attitudes. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3331-3340). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. The Impact of Robotics Competitions on Youth STEM Learning, Attitudes and 21st Century workplace Skills

    Gwen Nugent, Bradley Barker & Andrew White, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States; Neal Grandgenett, University of Nebraska at Omaha, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 3614–3619

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