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The Effects of Ubiquitous Computing on Student Learning: A Systematic Review PROCEEDINGS

, , , , Concordia University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

As technology use in education increases, interest in and implementations of ubiquitous computing initiatives have also increased. One-to-one laptop initiatives have sprung up throughout North America at the school, district, and state or province levels. This paper is an attempt to synthesize available studies of one-to-one initiatives at the K-12 level using both quantitative and narrative techniques. It is hoped that by so doing, best practices of these types of implementations can be identified.

Citation

Bethel, E.C., Bernard, R.M., Abrami, P.C. & Wade, C.A. (2007). The Effects of Ubiquitous Computing on Student Learning: A Systematic Review. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1987-1992). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 16, 2018 from .

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Cited By

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    Fida Atallah & Rana Tamim, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates; Linda Colburn, Bemidji State University, United States; Lina El Saadi, College of Education - Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 1576–1581

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