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Crime, compulsory schooling laws and education
ARTICLE

, , , Department of Economics, United Kingdom

Economics of Education Review Volume 54, Number 1, ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Do compulsory schooling laws reduce crime? Previous evidence for the US from the 1960s and 1970s suggests they do, primarily working through their effect on educational attainment to generate a causal impact on crime. In this paper, we consider whether more recent experience replicates this. There are two key findings. First, there is a strong and consistent negative effect on crime from stricter compulsory schooling laws. Second, there is a weaker and sometimes non-existent link between such laws and educational attainment. As a result, credible causal estimates of the education–crime relationship cannot in general be identified for the more recent period, though they can for some groups with lower education levels (in particular, for blacks).

Citation

Bell, B., Costa, R. & Machin, S. (2016). Crime, compulsory schooling laws and education. Economics of Education Review, 54(1), 214-226. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 8, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.09.007

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