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Measuring digital literacies: Junior high-school students' perceived competencies versus actual performance
ARTICLE

, Department of Learning, Israel ; , Department of Education and Psychology, Israel ; , Department of Counseling and Human Development, Israel

Computers & Education Volume 126, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The widespread belief is that youth, "digital natives", who live their entire lives in media-rich digital environments and are ubiquitously connected through social networks, naturally develop digital competencies. This study investigated digital literacies among 280 junior-high-school students with the aim of comparing participants' perceived digital literacy competencies and their actual performance in relevant digital tasks. The findings showed that only a few of participants' perceived skills were related to their actual performance. Generally, participants displayed high confidence in their digital literacies and significantly over-estimated their actual competencies. This gap was most evident in social-emotional skills, which were, on average, perceived by students as their strongest skills, while their actual level of performance was very low. Positive strong correlations were found between participants' self-reported evaluations of different digital skills, indicating their perception as a single factor, while actual performance tests revealed low-to medium-size correlations between different literacies. For educational decision-makers, the findings highlight the importance of designing training programs aimed to develop students' digital literacies, with a special emphasis on social-emotional competencies. Such training may enhance important competencies needed, reduce unfounded self-perceptions, and thus, develop efficient digital functioning in contemporary society.

Citation

Porat, E., Blau, I. & Barak, A. (2018). Measuring digital literacies: Junior high-school students' perceived competencies versus actual performance. Computers & Education, 126(1), 23-36. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved June 1, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2018.06.030

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