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Mitigation of Cognitive Bias with a Serious Game: Two Experiments Testing Feedback Timing and Source
ARTICLE

, University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Communication, Santa Barbara, California, United States ; , University of Oklahoma, Price College of Business and Center for Applied Social Research, Norman, Oklahoma, United States ; , , University of Oklahoma, Department of Communication, Norman, Oklahoma, United States ; , University of Florida, Department of Telecommunication, Gainesville, Florida, United States ; , , University of Oklahoma, K20 Center, Norman, Oklahoma, United States ; , Arizona State University, Hugh Downs School of Communication, Tempe, Arizona, United States ; , University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona, United States ; , Independent Researcher, Norman, Oklahoma, United States ; , University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona, United States ; , Christopher Newport University, Department of Communication, Newport News, Virginia, United States ; , University of Central Missouri, Department of Management, Warrensburg, Missouri, United States ; , University of Nebraska-Omaha, Department of Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis, Omaha, Nebraska, United States ; , Independent Researcher, Norman, Oklahoma, United States ; , Salem State University, Department of Communications, Salem, Massachusetts, United States ; , University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona, United States

International Journal of Game-Based Learning Volume 7, Number 4, ISSN 2155-6849 Publisher: IGI Global

Abstract

One of the benefits of using digital games for education is that games can provide feedback for learners to assess their situation and correct their mistakes. We conducted two studies to examine the effectiveness of different feedback design (timing, duration, repeats, and feedback source) in a serious game designed to teach learners about cognitive biases. We also compared the digital game-based learning condition to a professional training video. Overall, the digital game was significantly more effective than the video condition. Longer durations and repeats improve the effects on bias-mitigation. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference between just-in-time feedback and delayed feedback, and computer-generated feedback was more effective than feedback from other players.

Citation

Dunbar, N., Jensen, M., Miller, C., Bessarabova, E., Lee, Y.H., Wilson, S., Elizondo, J., Adame, B., Valacich, J., Straub, S., Burgoon, J., Lane, B., Piercy, C., Wilson, D., King, S., Vincent, C. & Schuetzler, R. (2017). Mitigation of Cognitive Bias with a Serious Game: Two Experiments Testing Feedback Timing and Source. International Journal of Game-Based Learning, 7(4), 86-100. IGI Global. Retrieved June 7, 2020 from .

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