You are here:

The Influence of Vicarious Learning on Explicit Bias and Knowledge Retention in an Online LGBT Competency Training Program
PROCEEDING

, , Arizona State University - Human Systems Engineering, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Previous research has shown that an individual’s bias can have a negative impact on behavior. One proposed method of modifying such behavior is vicarious (observational) learning. In the current study, the researcher explored the possibility of using vicarious learning to create an effective training video on LGBT bias. The researcher predicted that a vicarious learning video would be more effective at reducing negative LGBT bias than an informationally-equivalent control video. Participants completed the Explicit Attitudes of Sexuality questionnaire (EASQ), were randomized into one of two groups (vicarious or control), watched the assigned training video, and then completed the EASQ again to measure any changes in LGBT bias. The results of the study indicated that the vicarious video was no more effective in reducing negative LGBT bias when compared to the control. However, the vicarious training video was significantly more effective in eliciting new knowledge when compared to the control. Findings are discussed in relation to the Social Cognitive Theory for Personal and Social Change by Enabling Media.

Citation

Ioia, K.A. & Craig, S.D. (2018). The Influence of Vicarious Learning on Explicit Bias and Knowledge Retention in an Online LGBT Competency Training Program. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1034-1046). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References