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The context of online training, motivations and barriers on following them by travel agents in the United Kingdom, India and New Zealand.
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, , USI – Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

There are different existing options for the travel trade on learning about tourism destinations: attending training sessions organized by the tourism offices, by listening to TV programs, or by visiting a destination itself. Travel agents are also using specifically designed for them online training courses. We might envisage that they subscribe to such training activities due to the flexibility of the training offer. So far the motivations of the travel agents on doing eLearning courses about tourism destinations are still unknown. Phone interviews with the travel agents based in the United Kingdom, India and New Zealand were done in order to investigate what motivates and discourages them to participate in such training activities.

Citation

Kalbaska, N. & Cantoni, L. (2018). The context of online training, motivations and barriers on following them by travel agents in the United Kingdom, India and New Zealand. In T. Bastiaens, J. Van Braak, M. Brown, L. Cantoni, M. Castro, R. Christensen, G. Davidson-Shivers, K. DePryck, M. Ebner, M. Fominykh, C. Fulford, S. Hatzipanagos, G. Knezek, K. Kreijns, G. Marks, E. Sointu, E. Korsgaard Sorensen, J. Viteli, J. Voogt, P. Weber, E. Weippl & O. Zawacki-Richter (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 485-495). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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