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NMC Horizon Report: 2015 K-12 Edition REPORT

Abstract

What is on the five-year horizon for K-12 schools worldwide? Which trends and technologies will drive educational change? What are the challenges that we consider as solvable or difficult to overcome, and how can we strategize effective solutions? These questions and similar inquiries regarding technology adoption and transforming teaching and learning steered the collaborative research and discussions of a body of 56 experts to produce the NMC Horizon Report > 2015 K-12 Edition, in partnership with the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN). The NMC also gratefully acknowledges ISTE as a dissemination partner. The three key sections of this report — key trends, significant challenges, and important developments in educational technology — constitute a reference and straightforward technology planning guide for educators, school leaders, administrators, policymakers, and technologists. It is our hope that this research will help to inform the choices that institutions are making about technology to improve, support, or extend teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in K-12 education across the globe. View the wiki where the work was produced.

Citation

NMC. (2015). NMC Horizon Report: 2015 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved November 19, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Creating a “Classroom of the Future” for P-12 Pre-Service Educators

    Lucy Bush, Sherah Carr, Jeffrey Hall, Jon Saulson & Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Mercer University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 920–924

  2. Learning to take the tablet: How pre-service teachers use iPads to facilitate their learning

    Mark Pegrum, Christine Howitt & Michelle Striepe, The University of Western Australia

    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 29, No. 4 (Sep 22, 2013)

  3. How Can 3d Virtual Worlds Be Used To Support Collaborative Learning? An Analysis Of Cases From The Literature

    Mark Lee, Charles Sturt University, Australia

    Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society Vol. 5, No. 1 (2009) pp. 149–158

  4. Teachers’ Beliefs on Emerging Technologies in the Classroom

    Charles Hodges & Alyssa Prater, Georgia Southern University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 3167–3169

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