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Makification: Towards a Framework for Leveraging the Maker Movement in Formal Education
article

, Georgia State University, United States ; , Virginia Commonwealth University, United States ; , Texas State University, United States ; , Georgia State University, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 26, Number 3, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Maker culture is part of a burgeoning movement in which individuals leverage modern digital technologies to produce and share physical artifacts with a broader community. Certain components of the maker movement, if properly leveraged, hold promise for transforming formal education in a variety of contexts. The authors here work towards a framework for leveraging these components (i.e., creation, iteration, sharing, and autonomy) in support of learning in a variety of formal educational contexts and disciplines.

Citation

Cohen, J., Jones, W.M., Smith, S. & Calandra, B. (2017). Makification: Towards a Framework for Leveraging the Maker Movement in Formal Education. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 26(3), 217-229. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

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  2. Teacher Education in the Makerspace: What Might Makerspaces Afford for Teacher Education Programs?

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