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Pre-Service EFL Teachers' Resource Management
ARTICLE

Journal on School Educational Technology Volume 1, Number 1, ISSN 0973-2217

Abstract

Resource management strategies have been identified as important factors in the enhancement of students' learning. This article explores and describes the following: (1) Resource Management Strategies of third year pre-service EFL teachers; (2) Relationship between the Resource Management Strategies; and (3) Relationship between the gender variable and the Resource Management Strategies of third year pre-service EFL teachers. A total of 174 pre-service EFL teachers (males = 40, females = 134) completed the Motivated Learning Strategies Questionnaire (Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, & McKeachie, 1991). Results of the study indicate that pre-service EFL teachers showed poor time-management behaviours; they did not have the tendency to maintain focus and effort towards goals despite potential distractions; and they displayed both poor peer collaboration and help-seeking behaviours. The data shows that local culture has some important impact on how pre-service EFL teachers manage resources. The findings have implications for the improvement of pre-service EFL teacher education when attempting to foster effective management of resources. [The journal name ("Journal on School Education") on the pdf is incorrect.]

Citation

Tercanlioglu, L. (2005). Pre-Service EFL Teachers' Resource Management. Journal on School Educational Technology, 1(1), 48-56. Retrieved December 4, 2022 from .

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