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Recovering Knowledge for Science Education Research: Exploring the "Icarus Effect" in Student Work
ARTICLE

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CJSMTE Volume 14, Number 3, ISSN 1492-6156

Abstract

Science education research has built a strong body of work on students' understandings but largely overlooked the nature of science knowledge itself. Legitimation Code Theory (LCT), a rapidly growing approach to education, offers a way of analyzing the organizing principles of knowledge practices and their effects on science education. This article focuses on one specific concept from LCT--semantic gravity--that conceptualizes differences in context dependence. The article uses this concept to qualitatively analyze tertiary student responses to a thermal physics question. One result, that legitimate answers must reside within a specific range of context dependence, illustrates how a focus on the organizing principles of knowledge offers a way forward for science education.

Citation

Georgiou, H., Maton, K. & Sharma, M. (2014). Recovering Knowledge for Science Education Research: Exploring the "Icarus Effect" in Student Work. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 14(3), 252-268. Retrieved January 22, 2020 from .

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