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A Task-Centered Instructional Strategy
ARTICLE

Journal of Research on Technology in Education Volume 40, Number 1, ISSN 1539-1523

Abstract

Based on a review of instructional design models, previous papers identified first principles of instruction. These principles prescribe a cycle of instruction consisting of activation, demonstration, application, and integration. These instructional phases are best implemented in the context of real-world tasks. A Pebble-in-the-Pond approach to instructional development prescribes a task-centered, content-first instructional design procedure, which implements these first principles in the resulting instructional products. This conceptual paper elaborates the component analysis and instructional strategy phases of this instructional design model. This paper also integrates previous instructional strategy prescriptions from Component Display Theory with the content components of knowledge objects. The strategy for teaching within the context of a whole task consists of applying strategy components to these various knowledge components in a way that enables learners to see their interrelationships and their relationship to the whole. The resulting instructional strategy is a guided task-centered approach as contrasted with more learner-centered problem-based approaches to instructional design. The application of this component analysis and task-centered instructional strategy is illustrated. (Contains 1 footnote, 11 figures and 3 tables.)

Citation

Merrill, M.D. (2007). A Task-Centered Instructional Strategy. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 40(1), 5-22. Retrieved October 14, 2019 from .

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