You are here:

"A Desire for Growth": Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes
ARTICLE

, ,

Journal of Educators Online Volume 12, Number 2, ISSN 1547-500X Publisher: Journal of Educators Online

Abstract

Post-secondary educational institutions use various means to evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members. There are benefits to effective faculty evaluation, including advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader community (Boyer, 1990; Glassick, Huber, & Maeroff, 1997). While there is a body of research related to the evaluation of faculty in traditional settings, there have been fewer studies examining online faculty members' perceptions of evaluation processes. Further, due to the growth of online education, the existing evaluation scales, including those used in traditional settings, have been questioned (Berk, 2013; Hathorn & Hathorn, 2010; Rothman, Romeo, Brennan, & Mitchell, 2011). This qualitative study examines one university's online full-time faculty and their perceptions of the tools and processes used to evaluate their teaching. Through a systematic content analysis of survey data, findings indicate that online faculty members have a desire to grow as instructors, infrequently focusing on modality or job expectations as a means for growth. Participants expressed an interest in holistic, descriptive evaluation feedback by a range of stakeholders, particularly those with content knowledge. Study findings have implications for administrators and other stakeholders related to online full-time faculty, including the processes and documents through which they are evaluated. [The volume number (13) shown on the PDF is incorrect.]

Citation

DeCosta, M., Bergquist, E. & Holbeck, R. (2015). "A Desire for Growth": Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes. Journal of Educators Online, 12(2), 73-102. Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on November 3, 2015. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References