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Development and Simulation Testing of a Computerized Adaptive Version of the Philadelphia Naming Test
ARTICLE

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Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Volume 58, Number 3, ISSN 1092-4388

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996), to reduce test length while maximizing measurement precision. This article is a direct extension of a companion article (Fergadiotis, Kellough, & Hula, 2015), in which we fitted the PNT to a 1-parameter logistic item-response-theory model and examined the validity and precision of the resulting item parameter and ability score estimates. Method: Using archival data collected from participants with aphasia, we simulated two PNT-CAT versions and two previously published static PNT short forms, and compared the resulting ability score estimates to estimates obtained from the full 175-item PNT. We used a jackknife procedure to maintain independence of the samples used for item estimation and CAT simulation. Results: The PNT-CAT recovered full PNT scores with equal or better accuracy than the static short forms. Measurement precision was also greater for the PNT-CAT than the static short forms, though comparison of adaptive and static nonoverlapping alternate forms showed minimal differences between the two approaches. Conclusion: These results suggest that CAT assessment of naming in aphasia has the potential to reduce test burden while maximizing the accuracy and precision of score estimates.

Citation

Hula, W.D., Kellough, S. & Fergadiotis, G. (2015). Development and Simulation Testing of a Computerized Adaptive Version of the Philadelphia Naming Test. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58(3), 878-890. Retrieved September 18, 2020 from .

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