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Technology Acceptance and Social Presence in Distance Education--A Case Study on the Use of Teleconference at a Postgraduate Course of the Hellenic Open University
ARTICLE

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European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning Volume 16, Number 2, ISSN 1027-5207

Abstract

This paper examines specific technological and pedagogical parameters in relation to teleconference, namely the "perceived ease of use", the "perceived usefulness", the "social presence" and the "intention to use". A case study was conducted involving postgraduate students from a modular course of the School of Humanities of the Hellenic Open University. Based on this study, the preconditions for the efficient use of teleconference as an inclusive educational tool are also discussed. The results of the study suggest that a main condition for the successful educational use of teleconference is the familiarization with the technology (teleconference platform), so that it can be used with autonomy and ease. Furthermore, the more useful students believe that teleconference is for their studies, the greater is their intent to participate in teleconference meetings. Social presence, which is strongly correlated with the perceived ease of use and the perceived usefulness of teleconference, is considered very important for developing an appropriate educational environment and for increasing the satisfaction of students from a teleconference meeting. To enable, however, a widespread use of these tools and to avoid any exclusion of students, specific elements and conditions should be taken into account.

Citation

Mavroidis, I., Karatrantou, A., Koutsouba, M., Giossos, Y. & Papadakis, S. (2013). Technology Acceptance and Social Presence in Distance Education--A Case Study on the Use of Teleconference at a Postgraduate Course of the Hellenic Open University. European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning, 16(2), 76-96. Retrieved June 1, 2020 from .

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