You are here:

Technology, Models, and 21st-Century Learning: How Models, Standards, and Theories Make Learning Powerful PROCEEDINGS

, , Loyola University Maryland, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper describes the variety of educational technology models, how they all fall short in some ways, and how they can be used together to form a powerful integrative model that can be used to evaluate technology applications in the classroom. The integrative model is a tool to help teachers think about and improve their use of technology. It combines the best of various models, including SAMR, TPACK, Technology Integration Matrix, and more.

Citation

Marcovitz, D. & Janiszewski, N. (2015). Technology, Models, and 21st-Century Learning: How Models, Standards, and Theories Make Learning Powerful. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1227-1232). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 19, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Arizona K-12 Center. (2012). TIM: Arizona Technology Integration Matrix. Retrieved, October 23, 2014, from http://www.azk12.org/tim/ Buzbee, L. (2014, October 15). The simple genius of the blackboard: Why the board-centered classroom is still the best place to teach and learn. In Slate. Retrieved, October 23, 2014, from http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/10/a_history_of_the_blackboard_how_the_blackboard_became_an_effective_a
  2. Green, L.S. (2014). Examining technology integration in school librarianship. Knowledge Quest 43(1), 36-43.
  3. Harris, J., & Hofer, M. (2009). Instructional planning activity types as vehicles for curriculum-based TPACK development. In C.D. Maddux, (Ed.). Research highlights in technology and teacher education 2009 (pp. 99-108). Chesapeake, VA: Society for
  4. Jonassen, D.H. (2000). Computers as Mindtools for Schools: Engaging Critical Thinking, 2nd Ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merill. Leonard, L. (N.D.). Bloom's Taxonomy pyramid. Retrieved, December 11, 2014, from http://www.res.rcs.k-12.tn.us/teachers/leonardl/blooms_pyramid.htmlMcLeod,S.&Graber,J.Towardbettertechnologyintegration:Introducingtrudacot.Retrieved,October23,2014,fromhttp://dangerouslyirrelevant.org/2014/08/toward-better-technology-integration-introducing-trudacot.html
  5. Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record (108, 6), 1017-1054.
  6. Puentedura, R. (2014). Reuben Puentedura's Weblog. Retrieved, October 23, 2014, from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/ Sandholtz, J.H., Ringstaff, C., & Dwyer, D.C. (1997). Teaching with technology: Creating student-centered classrooms. New York: Techers College Press.
  7. Schön, D.A. (1983). The reflective practioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books.
  8. Wardlaw, L. (2014, January 30). New tools to get the most from your educational technology. Pearson: Research& Innovation Network. Retrieved, October 23, 2014, from http://researchnetwork.pearson.com/elearning/new_tools_to_get_the_most_from_your_educational_technology

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.