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Classroom Discussion and Threaded Electronic Discussion: Learning In Two Arenas
Article

, , Western Washington University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 2, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Classroom discussion is an important teaching strategy because of its relation to the development of participatory citizenship, critical thinking, and classroom community (Engel & Ochoa, 1988; Parker, 1996; Weikel, 1994). Discussion is particularly relevant in social studies education because of the mandate to prepare students for participatory democracy. Several studies (Weikel & Mangram, 1995; Larson, 2000; Larson & Parker, 1996) have examined the distinctive nature of discussion itself. Those studies indicate that there are various types of discussion that vary in purpose, content, and format. In this article the author begins a look at two general "types" of discussion in schools: classroom discussion,where face-to-face verbal interactions occur among students and teacher, and threaded electronic discussion, where the interactions occur electronically and asynchronously by way of a computer.

Citation

Larson, B.E. & Keiper, T.A. (2002). Classroom Discussion and Threaded Electronic Discussion: Learning In Two Arenas. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 2(1), 45-62. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved May 25, 2019 from .

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