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Leaders of School Technology Innovation: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Change Facilitator Style Questionnaire (CFSQ)
ARTICLE

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Journal of Educational Administration Volume 51, Number 5, ISSN 0957-8234

Abstract

Purpose: This paper aims to describe a construct validation study of the Change Facilitator Style Questionnaire (CFSQ), an instrument designed to measure the leadership style of school principals as change facilitators. Design/methodology/approach: Participants included 614 K-12 teachers across the state of Florida involved in the Enhancing Education Through Technology competitive grant program. Teachers completed the CFSQ to assess their overall perceptions of their principals in supporting a technology integration initiative. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was employed and carried out to verify the instrument factor structure. Five models were developed based on theory and practice, and were tested using CFA. Findings: The results showed the evidence of the CFSQ's reliability and validity. Research limitations/implications: Further research was recommended based on the results and limitations of this study. Originality/value: Little research has connected principal style to classroom technology adoption. The researchers conducted the reliability and validity testing on the CFSQ, an instrument designed to measure the leadership style of the school principal as a change facilitator. This study provides important validity evidence for the broader implementation of the CFSQ in future research studies. It could shed light on the design and development of a rigorous instrument in educational research. It can promote more research on technology-supported education and student learning outcomes considering the need for more reliable and valid instruments in this field. (Contains 7 tables and 1 figure.)

Citation

Liu, F., Ritzhaupt, A. & Cavanaugh, C. (2013). Leaders of School Technology Innovation: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Change Facilitator Style Questionnaire (CFSQ). Journal of Educational Administration, 51(5), 576-593. Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

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