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Distributed TPACK: Going Beyond Knowledge in the Head PROCEEDINGS

, , Politecnico di Milano, Italy ; , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The TPACK framework has received a lot of attention lately. For the most part, it has been seen as a form of teacher-knowledge residing within the head of individual teachers. Teaching with technology, however, is a complex task and often requires that teachers tap both social (other people) and cognitive tools (artifacts) successful. In this paper, we challenge the idea of TPACK being resident in just one individual and suggest that in some contexts it may be valuable to consider the idea of distributed TPACK. According to this approach TPACK may be conceptualized as being distributed across individuals (teachers, technologists, students) and artifacts (websites, lesson plans, books, software etc.). We build our argument based on, (a) distributed cognition theory; (b) revisiting prior research; and (c) evidence from two large-scale technology-based educational projects initiated by the Politecnico di Milano. We end with recommendations for future research and practice.

Citation

Di Blas, N., Paolini, P., Sawaya, S. & Mishra, P. (2014). Distributed TPACK: Going Beyond Knowledge in the Head. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2464-2472). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Knowledge Flows as a Way to Understand Learning Processes

    Stella Casola, Nicoletta Di Blas & Paolo Paolini, Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering (DEIB), Italy

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 921–926

  2. Unpacking TPACK: reconsidering knowledge and context in teacher practice.

    Michael Phillips, Monash University, Australia; Matthew Koehler & Joshua Rosenberg, Michigan State University, United States; Benjamin Zunica, Monash University, Australia

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 2422–2429

  3. Knowledge Flows in a Learning Process: the DDK Model

    Nicoletta Di BLAS, DEIB- Politecnico di MIlano, Italy; Paolo Paolini, DEIB-Politecnico di Milano, Italy

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 1507–1514

  4. Distributed TPACK What kind of teachers does it work for?

    Nicoletta Di Blas, Politecnico di Milano

    Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society Vol. 12, No. 3 (Jun 22, 2016)

  5. Looking outside the circles: Considering the contexts influencing TPACK development and enactment

    Michael Phillips, Monash University, Australia; Matthew Koehler & Joshua Rosenberg, Michigan State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 3029–3036

  6. MOOCs, Communities and Distributed TPACK

    Paolo Paolini, Nicoletta DI Blas & Aldo Torrebruno, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 3364–3369

  7. TPACK as shared practice: Toward a research agenda

    David Jones, Amanda Heffernan & Peter Albion, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 3287–3294

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