You are here:

Case studies in pathophysiology: The development and evaluation of an interactive online learning environment to develop higher order thinking and argumentation
DISSERTATION

, The Ohio State University, United States

The Ohio State University . Awarded

Abstract

This study presents a framework for examining the effects of higher order thinking on the achievement of allied health students enrolled in a pathophysiology course. A series of clinical case studies was developed and published in an enriched online environment that guided students through the process of developing a solution and supporting it through data analysis and interpretation. The series of case study modules scaffolded argumentation through question prompts. The modules began with a simple, direct problem and they became progressively more complex throughout the quarter. A control group was assigned a pencil-and-paper case study based upon recall. The case studies were scored for content accuracy and evidence of higher order thinking skills. Higher order thinking was measured using a rubric based upon the Toulmin argumentation pattern. The results indicated implementing a case study of either online or traditional format was associated with significant gains in achievement. The Web-enhanced case studies were associated with modest gains in knowledge acquisition. The argumentation scores across the series followed two trends: directed case studies were associated with higher levels of argumentation than ill-structured case studies, and there appeared to be an inverse relationship between the students’ argumentation and content scores. The protocols developed for this study can serve as a template for a larger, extended investigation into student learning in the online environment.

Citation

Titterington, L.C. Case studies in pathophysiology: The development and evaluation of an interactive online learning environment to develop higher order thinking and argumentation. Ph.D. thesis, The Ohio State University. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords