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Space matters: An institutional critique of distance learning within the English department at the University of Central Florida
DISSERTATION

, University of Central Florida, United States

University of Central Florida . Awarded

Abstract

In much of the scholarship of distance learning, context is often subordinate to utopian arguments for the spatial and temporal benefits of online pedagogy. To argue unilaterally that distance learning is successful, or not successful, is to misunderstand the ways in which institutions, departments, individual faculty, and students deploy courses and programs. All online courses are not created alike. What is needed are more localized, situated examinations of distance learning within the scope of a particular institution, even a particular department, in order to gauge online learning’s effects, and effectiveness, as a delivery mode of instruction. To understand these spaces more fully, it is important to evaluate the ways in which departments are technologizing their classrooms, their programs, their faculty, their courses, and thereby their institutions.

My dissertation examines distance learning within a local, particular context: UCF’s English department. In order to fully examine distance learning in this specific environment, I employ institutional critique as my methodology, a rhetorical and spatial approach that allows me to map distance learning within UCF’s English department. Drawing upon the work of David Harvey, I examine the experienced, perceived, and imagined spaces of distance learning in our department. Through an examination of the history of naming UCF, rhetorical analyses of institutional documents that reference technologies, analysis of survey results noting faculty attitudes and perceptions of online learning, and postmodern mapping of faculty members’ perceived and ideal spaces, we can find local solutions for local problems related to distance learning.

Citation

Mumpower, L.A. Space matters: An institutional critique of distance learning within the English department at the University of Central Florida. Ph.D. thesis, University of Central Florida. Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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