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High-technology crime investigation: A curricular needs assessment of the largest criminal justice and criminology programs in the United States DISSERTATION

, Texas A&M University, United States

Texas A&M University . Awarded

Abstract

The complexity and dynamic nature of high technology crime dictates the need for criminal justice and corporate information security personnel to develop and/or advance their knowledge concerning computer technology. To investigate high technology crime, an investigator should possess a baseline level of knowledge in the subject matter areas of criminal justice and criminology, principles of accounting and auditing, and computer operations and technology.

The primary purpose of this research project was to determine what knowledge elements are required to detect, investigate, and prosecute high technology crime. To determine what knowledge elements are associated with high technology crime, the target population was defined as academic leaders from the one hundred largest criminal justice and criminology undergraduate programs in the United States.

The first research question focused on determining which of the (O*NET) knowledge elements are associated with high technology crime. The knowledge elements Computers and Electronics, Public Safety and Security, and Economics and Accounting had the highest mean scores of the twenty-one knowledge elements included in the study.

The second research question was concerned with the extent to which criminal justice students were exposed to the required knowledge elements under current criminal justice curricula. The percentage of academic programs with students who were not sufficiently exposed to the identified knowledge elements under current criminal justice curricula was relatively high.

The third research question was concerned with the intent of criminal justice and criminology programs, with students who were not sufficiently exposed to a particular knowledge element, to modify their curricula to include the element in the future. The data revealed that students of many criminal justice and criminology programs were not sufficiently exposed to the essential knowledge elements pertaining to high technology crime investigation. The data also indicated that a large percentage of the programs were not planning to modify, or capable of modifying, their academic curricula to include these knowledge elements in the future.

Citation

Myers, L.J. High-technology crime investigation: A curricular needs assessment of the largest criminal justice and criminology programs in the United States. Ph.D. thesis, Texas A&M University. Retrieved October 22, 2017 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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