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Enriching everyday activities through the automated capture and access of live experiences. eClass : Building, observing and understanding the impact of capture and access in an educational domain
DISSERTATION

, Georgia Institute of Technology, United States

Georgia Institute of Technology . Awarded

Abstract

We spend much of our lives gathering and processing information. In academia, a large portion of the day is spent listening to and recording the surrounding events that occur in meetings and classroom lectures. Unfortunately, we are not always good at capturing information in a meaningful way and often spend our time trying to remember a piece of information presented to us in past because we do not have a sufficient record of that experience.

This thesis describes a classroom built to record the slides and handwriting presented in a lecture along with audio and video and any Web pages visited during the lecture. All of the captured material was made available immediately after the lecture for student access. The technology, originally called Classroom 2000, then later renamed eClass, was used in real classes at Georgia Tech for nearly four years. To help evaluate eClass, at the end of each course, students were asked to fill out surveys regarding their attitudes and opinions of the system. Additionally, access sessions to the on-line captured notes were logged and analyzed. Our analysis shows that both students and teachers find the technology worthwhile and a useful learning tool. We show that eClass helps to encourage more ‘summary style’ note taking in the classroom, and that its use does not result in decreased attendance. The online notes are mostly used for immediate lecture review and exam study, but continue to be used well after the semester ends. We have found that by allowing students to concentrate more on the material being taught (rather than being copy machines), eClass affects both students and teachers in mostly positive ways.

We believe that in order to properly apply ubiquitous computing research you must first construct a living system that becomes everyday In some domain (college lectures, in our case). Once you have achieved authentic use, then the system can be evaluated. This thesis helps show that our method is indeed a valid method of research and one that enables a deep understanding of how technology affects both the situation it is used in and the people in it.

Citation

Brotherton, J.A. Enriching everyday activities through the automated capture and access of live experiences. eClass : Building, observing and understanding the impact of capture and access in an educational domain. Ph.D. thesis, Georgia Institute of Technology. Retrieved June 5, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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