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Choosing the medium: Comparing the effectiveness of video and computer-based presentations as an instructional tool
THESIS

, University of Nevada, Reno, United States

University of Nevada, Reno . Awarded

Abstract

An experimental design was used to compare the effectiveness of computer-based presentations and video presentations as instructional tools. Subjects were 89 college students. Independent variables were computer attitude, treatment, and learning style (determined by Kolb's Learning Style). Dependent variables were involvement, liking, and recall. As predicted, subjects who viewed the computer-based presentation reported more involvement and liking of the presentation than subjects who viewed the video presentation. Contrary to the hypothesis that suggested that reflective observers would prefer the video, the results indicated that all processing styles reported higher involvement and liking of the computer-based presentation. Computer attitude also had no effect on involvement or liking. This finding supports the idea that computer-based instruction can be universally effective. However, recall of information was not affected by presentation type, processing style, or computer attitude, suggesting that while subjects liked the information better in a computer-based presentation, they did not learn more.

Citation

Gubman, J.H. Choosing the medium: Comparing the effectiveness of video and computer-based presentations as an instructional tool. Master's thesis, University of Nevada, Reno. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords