You are here:

A qualitative narrative phenomenological study: Parental perceptions in choosing online educational classes for gifted children
DISSERTATION

, University of Phoenix, United States

University of Phoenix . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative narrative phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of parents of gifted student children who live in the United States, who have gone through the process of locating and selecting an online class, and who have worked with the online educational environment offering the class. Parents often select online classes to meet the educational needs of their gifted child since the educational system in the United States frequently does not provide an adequate education for gifted children (Johnsen, 2009; Mooji, 2008; Sener, 2010). Perceptions and experiences narrated by the parent participants of this qualitative study will add understanding and insight into the phenomena addressed in this study. Understanding these perceptions and experiences may assist online educators and organizations in tailoring their online offerings. Understanding may also assist parents in their search for appropriate online classes for their gifted student child. The parent participants were interviewed using an open-ended and general question format. Data were collected and analyzed using manual analysis and NVivo 10 research software. Four core themes resulted from the data analysis. The study concludes with recommendations for educational leaders and policymakers with suggestions for further research.

Citation

Stein, K.L. A qualitative narrative phenomenological study: Parental perceptions in choosing online educational classes for gifted children. Ph.D. thesis, University of Phoenix. Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords