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Self-reported competency in performance of computer literacy skills for nursing among baccalaureate nurse educators and self-reported integration of these skills into the curriculum through teaching practice
DISSERTATION

, University of Massachusetts Lowell, United States

University of Massachusetts Lowell . Awarded

Abstract

This descriptive, cross-sectional survey research study was designed to collect data from nurse educators in regard to their self-reported competence in performance of sixty computer literacy skills for nursing, as well as self-reported levels of integration, through teaching practice, of these computer literacy skills for nursing into the curricula of their respective baccalaureate nursing programs. Information was also collected from each respondent regarding seventy-seven pre-existing characteristics, including personal attributes, departmental program characteristics, and personal perceptions regarding computer technology for nursing. Data were received from 184 respondents who were faculty members currently teaching in eighteen, publicly funded, National League for Nursing accredited, college and university baccalaureate degree programs in the New England region.

Data analysis revealed that the mean computer literacy for nursing skills performance score achieved by respondents was 138.39, out of a possible maximum score of 240. Twenty-one of the sixty skills were being performed "well" or "very well" as reported by 50% or more of respondents. This study also revealed that in the area of curriculum integration through teaching practice, of computer literacy skills for nursing, respondents achieved a mean score of 105.22, out of a possible maximum score of 240. Only three of the sixty skills were being integrated into teaching practice either "moderately" or "extensively" as reported by 50% or more of respondents. These results raise concern when one considers that each of the sixty skills that appeared on the survey research questionnaire had been identified as highly important for graduates of nursing degree programs by a national study of nurse educators (Bryson, 1989). Ninety percent (90%) of respondents indicated that their programs did not require students to take a basic computer course and also reported that their programs did not offer a "Computers in Nursing" course. Simple factorial ANOVA revealed that, of the twenty-seven pre-existing characteristics examined in this study, seven of these impacted significantly on skills performance scores, while eight impacted significantly on teaching integration scores.

Another major finding of this research study suggested that faculty who have the ability to comfortably perform requisite computer literacy skills for nursing are more likely to integrate these skills into the curriculum through their teaching practices (r =.76; p = $<$.01). In addition, correlation analysis of school means on the two composite variables also demonstrated a strong positive correlation (r =.72, p = $<$.01).

Citation

Austin, S.I. Self-reported competency in performance of computer literacy skills for nursing among baccalaureate nurse educators and self-reported integration of these skills into the curriculum through teaching practice. Ph.D. thesis, University of Massachusetts Lowell. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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