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Identifying Predictors of Achievement in the Newly Defined Information Literacy: A Neural Network Analysis
ARTICLE

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College Student Journal Volume 43, Number 4, ISSN 0146-3934

Abstract

Information Literacy is a concept that evolved as a result of efforts to move technology-based instructional and research efforts beyond the concepts previously associated with "computer literacy." While computer literacy was largely a topic devoted to knowledge of hardware and software, information literacy is concerned with students' abilities to construct/collect and analyze information for effective decision making. This study was designed to assess the information literacy achievement levels of college students and to identify variables associated with positive student achievement. Predictors of achievement on a standardized test of information literacy were identified, using a standardized instrument to capture student information literacy scores, and a Neural Network (NN) statistical analysis. Successful predictors included ACT scores, undergraduate major, number of classes, number of tasks completed, high school grade point average, ethnicity and work status. (Contains 3 tables.)

Citation

Sexton, R., Hignite, M., Margavio, T.M. & Margavio, G.W. (2009). Identifying Predictors of Achievement in the Newly Defined Information Literacy: A Neural Network Analysis. College Student Journal, 43(4), 1084-1093. Retrieved June 1, 2020 from .

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