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A comparison of Web 2.0 tools in a doctoral course
ARTICLE

Internet and Higher Education Volume 13, Number 4, ISSN 1096-7516 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Adult, professional students in a doctoral-level course used Web 2.0 tools such as wikis, blogs, and online discussions to develop answers to six “Big Questions” related to higher education finance and also produced a research paper that used original data or the research literature to improve understanding of a specific topic. At the close of the course, students were asked to provide examples of learning for each question and each tool, and to evaluate the tools used. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy was used to evaluate levels of learning. Results indicated that the level of learning mirrored that of the Big Question or was at higher levels when students used new tools. Wikis generated objections from students who did not care for group work, although others found it a good collaborative tool. Blogs were more acceptable, but online discussions were preferred because of the interaction and sharing among students. Research papers allowed students to learn material of their own interest and to do so in depth.

Citation

Meyer, K.A. (2010). A comparison of Web 2.0 tools in a doctoral course. Internet and Higher Education, 13(4), 226-232. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Internet and Higher Education on January 29, 2019. Internet and Higher Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2010.02.002

Keywords

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