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Hypertext Segmentation and Goal Compatibility: Effects on Study Strategies and Learning
Article

, , Carnegie Mellon University, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 8, Number 3, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Hypertext allows students to select information for study ac-cording to their individual needs. This flexibility potentially increases study efficiency, but may consequently decrease breadth of learning. The current research examined this trade-off for hypertext segmented either into many small units (more segmented) or fewer larger units (less segment-ed). It compared study strategies and text recall with a more-and less-segmented hypertext when (a) the more specific units of the more-segmented hypertext facilitated informa-tion location for the study goal, and (b) the location of goal-related information was equally apparent with both hyper-texts. Readers with a more-segmented hypertext focused on goal-related content, resulting in detailed memory for goal units but narrower overall recall. Readers with a less-seg-mented hypertext explored unrelated units, and recalled a broader range of content. However, when the larger size of these less-segmented units made information location more difficult, fewer readers completed the goal. This research suggests that different content segmentations may be appro-priate for different types of goals with hypertext. When the text segmentation is incompatible with the study goal, effec-tive use of hypertext may depend on learner characteristics influencing study persistence (e.g., prior knowledge, motiva-tion, study skills, etc.).

Citation

Dee-Lucas, D. & Larkin, J.H. (1999). Hypertext Segmentation and Goal Compatibility: Effects on Study Strategies and Learning. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 8(3), 279-313. Charlottesville, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2019 from .

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