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Blended Learning: Uncovering Its Transformative Potential in Higher Education ARTICLE

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Internet and Higher Education Volume 7, Number 2, ISSN 1096-7516

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide a discussion of the transformative potential of blended learning in the context of the challenges facing higher education. Based upon a description of blended learning, its potential to support deep and meaningful learning is discussed. From here, a shift to the need to rethink and restructure the learning experience occurs and its transformative potential is analyzed. Finally, administrative and leadership issues are addressed and the outline of an action plan to implement blended learning approaches is presented. The conclusion is that blended learning is consistent with the values of traditional higher education institutions and has the proven potential to enhance both the effectiveness and efficiency of meaningful learning experiences. (Contains 2 figures.)

Citation

Garrison, D.R. & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended Learning: Uncovering Its Transformative Potential in Higher Education. Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95-105. Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

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