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The Effect of 4-H Robotics and Geospatial Technologies on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Learning and Attitudes PROCEEDINGS

, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families, and Schools, United States ; , University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States ; , Univeersity of Nebraska at Omaha, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vienna, Austria ISBN 978-1-880094-65-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This study investigated the use of educational robotics, paired with GPS and GIS geospatial technologies, as a context for learning selected concepts in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) within an informal learning environment. The study was conducted in two different weeklong 4-H camp experiences and involved 38 students between the ages of 11 to 15. A pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design was used in the study. Instrumentation consisted of a 29-question multiple-choice assessment targeting various STEM topics, and a 36-question attitude questionnaire assessing STEM interest. Results suggest that the 4-H robotics and geospatial summer camp program is a promising approach for supporting STEM-related learning through informal education.

Citation

Nugent, G., Barker, B. & Grandgenett, N. (2008). The Effect of 4-H Robotics and Geospatial Technologies on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Learning and Attitudes. In J. Luca & E. Weippl (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2008--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 447-452). Vienna, Austria: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 22, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Measuring the Impact of Robotics and Geospatial Technologies on Youth Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Attitudes

    Gwen Nugent, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families, and Schools, United States; Bradley Barker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States; Michael Toland, University of Kentucky, United States; Neal Grandgenett, University of Nebraska-Omaha, United States; Amy Hampton & Viacheslav Adamchuk, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2009 (Jun 22, 2009) pp. 3331–3340

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.