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Issues and Barriers to Advanced Faculty Use of Technology PROCEEDINGS

, Iowa State University, United States ; , Iowa Sate University, United States ; , Iowa State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-47-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper reveals what six faculty members who have used technology significantly in teaching and learning see as issues and barriers to their continued use of technology in their teacher preparation courses. These barriers and issues include time, technology downtime, meaningful use of technology, and a need of community of support faculty and staff. Future work in addressing these issues is recommended to sustain innovative technology integration in teacher education programs.

Citation

Chuang, H.H., Thompson, A. & Schmidt, D. (2003). Issues and Barriers to Advanced Faculty Use of Technology. In C. Crawford, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2003--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3449-3452). Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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