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Synergy Education Press: Tools for Teachers' Professional Development
PROCEEDINGS

, Synergy Education Press, Inc., United States ; , University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States ; , University of Texas-Austin, United States

International Conference on Mathematics / Science Education and Technology, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

Synergy Education Press, Inc. is a small company whose aim is to provide high-quality research-based teacher professional development materials for elementary mathematics and science educators. We will provide packages of multimedia and text-based products to help elementary math and science teachers develop deeper understandings of how children think about core math and science ideas (e.g., measurement, spatial reasoning, or inquiry-based science) and how to go about teaching these powerful ideas to their students. We differ from other companies in that we are not developing software or curriculum materials to be used by students, per se, nor will we explicitly help teachers learn how to use technology in their classrooms. Rather, we will use technology to help teachers learn how to be better teachers. Our products are intended for pre- and in-service teachers, home-school teachers, teacher education programs, and anyone interested in learning how to be a better teacher of math and science to young children.

Citation

Horvath, J., Lehrer, R., Koehler, M. & Petrosino, A. (2000). Synergy Education Press: Tools for Teachers' Professional Development. In Proceedings of International Conference on Mathematics / Science Education and Technology 2000 (pp. 2-3). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 24, 2019 from .

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