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Conference on Scholarly Communication and Technology

April 1997

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Table of Contents

Number of papers: 24

  1. Cost and Value in Electronic Publishing

    James J. O'Donnell

    A founding co-editor of Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) examines the costs and benefits of networked electronic communication for scholars. Some of the tools that have the potential to change the... More

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  2. Information Based Productivity

    Scott Bennett

    A digital project undertaken last year at Yale (Connecticut) offers an opportunity to explore productivity matters. The project aimed at improving the quality of library support and of student... More

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  3. A New Consortial Model for Building Digital Libraries

    Raymond K. Neff

    The libraries in U.S. research universities are being systematically depopulated of current subscriptions to scholarly journals. Annual increases in subscription costs are consistently outpacing... More

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  4. Consortial Access versus Ownership

    Richard W. Meyer

    This paper reports on a consortial attempt to overcome the high costs of scholarly journals and to study the roots of the cost problem. A multi-discipline study of the impact of electronic... More

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  5. The Cross Currents of Technology Transfer: The Czech and Slovak Library Information Network

    Andrew Lass

    A simplified account of an extensive library automation and networking project that the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initiated and funded in the Czech and Slovak republics is provided in this paper.... More

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  6. The Transition to Electronic Content Licensing: The Institutional Context in 1997

    Ann Okerson

    Instead of relying on national copyright law, surrounding case law, international treaties, and prevailing practice to govern information transactions for electronic information, copyright holders ... More

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  7. Mellon Conference: Panel on "Licensing, Copyright and Fair Use." The HYPATIA Project (toward an ASCAP for Academics)

    Jane C. Ginsburg & Morton L. Janklow

    The HYPATIA Project envisions the creation of a digital depository and licensing and tracking service for unpublished "academic" works, including working papers, other works-in-progress, lectures, ... More

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  8. Digital Image Quality: From Conversion to Presentation and Beyond

    Anne R. Kenney

    This paper advocates a strategy of "full informational capture" to ensure that digital objects rich enough to be useful over time are created in the most cost-effective manner. Digital benchmarking... More

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  9. Technical Standards and Medieval Manuscripts

    Eric Hollas

    Even though medieval manuscripts represent the most voluminous surviving artifact from the Middle Ages, the very nature of this resource presents challenges for usage. In an effort to preserve... More

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  10. Making Technology Work for Scholarship: Investing in the Data

    Susan Hockey

    This paper examines issues related to how providers and consumers can make the best use of electronic information, focusing on the humanities. Topics include: new technology or old; electronic text... More

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  11. Digital Documents and the Future of the Academic Community

    Peter Lyman

    This paper examines the dynamics of change in scholarly publishing and the impact of technological innovation upon the academic community for which the system of scholarly communication serves as... More

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  12. Online Books at Columbia: Measurement and Early Results on Use, Satisfaction, and Effect

    Carol A. Mandel, Mary C. Summerfield & Paul Kantor

    The Online Books Evaluation Project at Columbia University (New York) explores the potential for online books to become significant resources in academic libraries. The Project confronts and... More

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  13. Digital Libraries: A Unifying or Distributing Force?

    Michael Lesk

    This paper addresses several questions about digital libraries. What kinds of communities will digital library technology produce? The Web seems much more popular then electronic journals--does... More

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  14. Patterns of Use for the Bryn Mawr Reviews

    Richard Hamilton & Paul Shory

    Bryn Mawr Reviews (BMR) produces two electronic review journals, "Bryn Mawr Classical Review," (BMCR) which also comes out in paper and "Bryn Mawr Medieval Review" (BMMR). BMR has two sets of users... More

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  15. Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work. Analysis of JSTOR: The Impact on Scholarly Practice of Access to On-Line Journal Archives

    Thomas A. Finholt & JoAnn M. Brooks

    This study reports on faculty response to the Journal STORage project (JSTOR), an online system for accessing digital back archives of core journals in history and economics. Data were collected... More

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  16. The Economics of Electronic Journals

    Andrew Odlyzko

    It is widely accepted that scholarly journals will have to be available in digital formats; what is not settled is whether they can be much less expensive than print journals. This paper is divided... More

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  17. The Effect of Price: Early Observations

    Karen Hunter

    Scientific journal publishers have very little commercial experience with electronic full text distribution and it is difficult to segregate the effect of pricing on user acceptance and behavior.... More

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  18. JSTOR: The Development of a Cost-Driven, Value-Based Pricing Model

    Kevin M. Guthrie

    JSTOR (Journal STORage project) began as a project of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation designed to help libraries address growing persistent space problems. JSTOR was established as an independent... More

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  19. The Future of Electronic Journals

    Hal R. Varian

    It is widely expected that a great deal of scholarly communication will move to an electronic format. This paper speculates about the impact this movement will have on the form of scholarly... More

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  20. Economics of Electronic Publishing: Cost Issues--Comments on Session One Presentations

    Robert Shirrell

    This paper comments on three presentations (Janet Fisher, Malcolm Getz, and Bill Regier) at the Scholarly Communication and Technology Conference; it focuses on publisher costs, and also discusses ... More

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