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Journal of Information Technology Education: Research

Jan 01, 2011 Volume 10, Number 1

Editors

Lynn Jeffrey; Christopher Cheong

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Table of Contents

Number of articles: 25

  1. Principals’ Attitudes towards ICT and Their Perceptions about the Factors That Facilitate or Inhibit ICT Integration in Primary Schools of Cyprus

    Photos Papaioannou, Ministry of Education and Culture, Cyprus; Kyriacos Charalambous, Frederick University, Cyprus

    This study explores the Cyprus primary school principals’ attitudes towards Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) as well as their perceptions about the factors that facilitate or... More

    pp. 349-369

  2. Principals’ Attitudes towards ICT and Their Perceptions about the Factors That Facilitate or Inhibit ICT Integration in Primary Schools of Cyprus

    Photos Papaioannou & Kyriacos Charalambous

    pp. 349-369

    View Abstract
  3. Expectations of Competency: The Mismatch between Employers’ and Graduates’ Views of End-User Computing Skills Requirements in the Workplace

    Shirley Gibbs & Gary Steel, Lincoln University, New Zealand; Alison Kuiper, The University of Sydney, Australia

    The use of computers has become part of everyday life. The high prevalence of computer use appears to lead employers to assume that university graduates will have the good computing skills... More

    pp. 371-382

  4. Expectations of Competency: The Mismatch between Employers’ and Graduates’ Views of End-User Computing Skills Requirements in the Workplace

    Shirley Gibbs, Gary Steel & Alison Kuiper

    pp. 371-382

    View Abstract
  5. Developing Digital Information Literacy in Higher Education: Obstacles and Supports

    Lynn Jeffrey, Massey University, New Zealand; Bronwyn Hegarty, Otago Polytechnic, New Zealand; Oriel Kelly, Manakau Institute of Technology, New Zealand; Merrolee Penman, Dawn Coburn & Jenny McDonald, Otago University, New Zealand

    The development of digital information literacy (DIL) has been slow in comparison to changes in information communication technologies, and this remains an issue for the higher education sector.... More

    pp. 383-413